The Lake House by Marci Nault – review

the lake house

When Heather Bregman purchased the little house on the lake, she imagined afternoons in the sun, evenings by a bonfire, and growing friendships with the neighbors in the close knit New England neighborhood.

She quickly realized this was not to be. The neighbors – all over 70, living in the homes they grew up in and having known each other since birth – were not happy to have a newcomer invade their space. Determined to drive her away, the men of the little community pranked her house with cigar smoke, ants, and stink bombs while the women greeted her icily or ignored her completely.

Victoria Rose moved back to her home on the lake hoping to make amends with the only family she had left. Still hurting from her decision to move to California to pursue an acting career over 50 years ago, her childhood friends met Victoria with much the same cold welcome they gave Heather. Two lonely souls with more in common than the vast age difference would suggest, Victoria and Heather quickly became close friends.

Together they navigated the fallout from their personal and profession decisions, both finally learning – to have a friend you must be a friend.

I have to admit I almost put this book down after the first several pages. Jumping from character to character and moving back and forth through time, it was a bit much to follow – and very slow to engage. I am glad I stuck it out. As the chapters passed a lovely story developed, showing that even our most personal decisions can deeply effect those around us, and reminding us that when we think of others instead of ourselves, happiness follows.

Surprising and comical, I laughed out and smiled through the entire book. Definitely a keeper.

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Longbourn by Jo Baker – review

LongbournLongbourn Manor, rural England, early 1800’s, also the setting of Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. I’m a little ashamed to admit I have never read this classic, but may now need to.

This story centers around Sarah, the young house maid of Longbourn Manor and the other below floor servants who have been her family since she was orphaned as a young child. Sarah often dreamed of the world beyond the little town outside her neighborhood, but had comfortably reconciled herself to a life of repetition – each day the same as the last, for all the many years ahead.

The militia’s unexpected arrival in town, an eligible bachelor’s purchase of the vacant home next door, and the interesting stranger’s addition to the staff shake things up at Longbourn Manor, sending some of them down paths they’d never expected, bringing others full circle.

When Sarah is presented with every opportunity she thought she wanted, she has to choose between the life she’d dreamed of and a life of continued difficulty and hard times, with the chance of true love and happiness.

Some story twists and turns were a bit predictable, some completely unexpected, and some I thought improbable but still hoped for. I was not disappointed.

I loved this book. Should I now read Pride and Prejudice, or just leave well enough alone and stick to the story from the servants’ point of view?

The Art of Arranging Flowers by Lynne Branard ~ Review

the art of arranging flowers

Flowers have the power to heal heart and body, mend broken relationships, bring together new love, and accomplish almost any other miracle or wish of the heart. That seems to be true when Ruby Jewell is arranging the flowers. After an early life filled with tragedy, Ruby uses her bouquets to bring hope, love, and happiness to the residents of small town Creekside, Washington. When all those she has helped through the years decide it’s time for Ruby to find love, amazing things happen.

I love the idea that flowers have power. If the color of the walls of a room can induce a particular feeling and essential oils can alleviate various ailments, then the look, feel, and smell of flowers must have similar qualities.

Although many of the twists and turns were predictable, I still really enjoyed the story.  Likely to be one I read again.